April 17, 2024

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WCC students visit Fort Leonard Wood’s construction research laboratory | Article

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WCC students visit Fort Leonard Wood’s construction research laboratory | Article

WCC students visit Fort Leonard Wood’s construction research laboratory | Article








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Kevin Forshey, an engineer technician at the Contingency Basing Integration and Technology Evaluation Center, explains to Waynesville Career Center students how the temporary structure they are inside is made to be easily constructed and broke down.
(Photo Credit: Photo by Melissa Buckley, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office)

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Craig White, facility manager for the Contingency Basing Integration and Technology Evaluation Center on Fort Leonard Wood, shows students from the Waynesville Career Center around the site during Tuesday’s field trip.








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Craig White, facility manager for the Contingency Basing Integration and Technology Evaluation Center on Fort Leonard Wood, shows students from the Waynesville Career Center around the site during Tuesday’s field trip.
(Photo Credit: Photo by Melissa Buckley, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office)

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FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — More than 50 students from the Waynesville Career Center got hands on with some of the Army’s newest construction technology during a field trip Tuesday to the Contingency Basing Integration and Technology Evaluation Center on post.

“This is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratory. We occupy this site on Fort Leonard Wood to do our construction and power evaluations of new technologies,” said Craig White, CBITEC facility manager. “We are showing the students the construction side of the CERL today. All the buildings they are touring are semi-permanent buildings built by Soldiers.”

White said the CBITEC has smaller base camps, or forward operating bases, that can operate on generators, and larger ones, like the size the U.S. Army Prime Power School must provide power for, “but nothing here is permanent. Everything can be torn down and moved.”

The WCC primarily provides career and technical education for high school students. White said the CBITEC is the perfect place for the students to learn about different kinds of construction and the opportunities the Army has to offer.

“I hope they see a different side of the military today — one they can relate to — one that may help them reach their engineering goals. There are so many new technologies emerging all the time, like now we are using 3D printing and 3D concrete printing. We want them to see these technologies and opportunities to advance their careers,” White said. “These skills learned in the military will directly transfer to the civilian construction world.”

While walking through the site, White encouraged the students to go inside the buildings, see how they are put together, inspect how they work and ask questions.

Seventeen-year-old student Landyn Nadermann from Laquey, Missouri, said his favorite part of the visit was touring the expandable hygiene container.

“It was like a portable bathroom and shower building. It was interesting,” Nadermann said.

White said they consider these containers, “relocatable space. The relocatable spaces usually come in a 20-foot container. The containers kind of open like a transformer, they just pop out — boom, there is an office or sleep space. Then they fold right back up, you can load them on a truck and take them to your next destination.”

Alvin Hoffman, a masonry instructor at the WCC, said his favorite part of the tour was learning about the 3D printed concrete t-walls and barriers.

“The 3D printed concrete stuff is interesting. I have never seen anything like that before,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman has been an instructor at the career center for 16 years but said this was his first time ever visiting the CBITEC.

“I think this is very interesting. I didn’t realize the Army had so many opportunities. I am glad we were able to bring them out here and show them what is available to them,” Hoffman said.

Nadermann has been attending classes at the Waynesville Career Center for two years.

“I am interested in all kinds of construction, especially concrete work,” Nadermann said.

Nadermann said he was glad he got the chance to visit CBITEC because in learning construction, it “helps to be here, see it and touch it.”

Hoffman said he hoped the field trip helped his students realize, “there are more opportunities for them than just bricklayer, concrete or construction.”

“I hope this visit helps them plan for their future. For some of my students, the Army would be a good avenue for them to choose. It will give them more opportunities. Anything they want to try, I am here to support them,” Hoffman said.

Nadermann said he had never considered the Army as an option for his future — until he saw some of the new technology he could be using at the CBITEC.

“I think this may be something I need to look in to,” Nadermann said.

Some of the U.S. Army Engineer military occupational specialties include Carpentry and Masonry Specialist, Construction Equipment Repairer, Horizonal Construction Engineer, Interior Electrician, Plumber, Power Distribution Specialist, Quarrying Specialist, Tactical Power Generation Specialist, Technical Engineer. For more information on mechanics and engineering MOSs, visit the Army’s career webpage.

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